Due to a recent court decision, primaries for U.S. House and State Senate may be delayed until August. More info to come.

Learn more about your rights as a NYC voter and where to find help if you need it.

Every New York voter has the right to cast a ballot privately and independently. If you need help filling out your ballot due to disability or limited English proficiency, support is available. 

Ballot Marking Device 

Ballot Marking Devices are available at all poll sites to help voters fill out their ballots during early voting and on Election Day. These devices can be helpful to voters who are blind, visually impaired, or have a disability or condition that makes it difficult or impossible to mark a ballot with a pen. However, any voter can request to use a Ballot Marking Device.

You can use a Ballot Marking Device to see your ballot on a display screen, listen to your choices through headphones, or translate your ballot into additional languages. If you’d like to use a Ballot Marking Device, just ask a poll worker!

The device provides four ways to mark your ballot:

  • Touch screen
  • Sip & puff device
  • Keypad (Braille)
  • Rocker paddle

Learn more about Ballot Marking Devices from the Board of Elections

The NYC Board of Elections explains how to use the features on Ballot Marking Devices

 

Accessible Absentee Ballot

If you are visually impaired or cannot mark a paper ballot, you can still vote by mail. Accessible absentee ballots can be read by a screen reader and filled out using a computer. You may request an accessible ballot from the NYC Board of Elections. 

Voters who request an accessible absentee ballot can use their personal adaptive technology to mark and print their absentee ballot from home. To vote with an accessible absentee ballot, you must print out your ballot before returning it to the Board of Elections.

Request an absentee ballot

Language Access

By law, New York City ballots and other voting materials are translated into Bengali, Chinese, Korean, and Spanish at certain poll sites based on local Census Data.

In addition, interpreters are available at some poll sites to provide assistance in these languages and others, such as Arabic, Haitian Creole, Russian, and Yiddish. You can learn which poll sites offer translators in each language at the Civic Engagement Commission’s website.

If you need language assistance at a poll site, you also have the right to bring your own interpreter with you.

Learn more about your rights as a voter

Request an accessible absentee ballot

Accessible Absentee Ballot

You can request an accessible absentee ballot from the Board of Elections

Request an accessible absentee ballot
See poll sites

Language Assistance

The NYC Civic Engagement Commission provides interpreters at some poll sites

See poll sites

Top FAQs

Can I bring someone to help me vote?

Yes! As long as they are not your employer or union representative, you can bring someone to help you vote. You can also always ask a poll worker for help.

Can I request an accessible absentee ballot?

Yes! If you are visually impaired or have a disability that requires you to use an accessible version of the absentee ballot that can be read by a screen reader and marked digitally, you may request an accessible ballot from the NYC Board of Elections. Request an accessible absentee ballot.

Are poll sites accessible?

Yes! The NYC Board of Elections ensures that every poll site in the city is accessible to all voters during early voting and Election Day. If there are any issues with your poll site, you can contact the Board of Elections at 1-866-Vote-NYC (212-487-5496).